Paddlers Report Kayaking, Canoeing, and SUP Blog
Twitter    Facebook   Paddlers Report
Welcome, anonymous (Log in)   RSS Newsfeed
Fun #Weekend Getaway
Posted by Richard Phillips   •   Monday, 2016-May-23

By Marcia Drewitz

Do you and your family love the great outdoors? Want a fun weekend getaway that includes something for everyone? Then head to southeastern Oklahoma - the Beavers Bend State Park area - an area known as the "Little Smokies."

Beavers Bend State Park and the surrounding Kiamichi Mountains are an outdoor lover's paradise. The Kiamichi Mountains are part of the Ouachita National Forest. "Ouachita" means "happy hunting grounds" as translated from Native American, but you will not have to hunt for fun things to do on a weekend adventure here.

Beavers Bend State Park includes Broken Bow Lake, which has mirror-clear water due to its being surrounded by mountains. The lake is not only good for swimming, kayaking, canoeing, wave running, parasailing, and paddle boating, but the area is also great for scuba diving and snorkeling, thanks to its deep valleys and one-of-a-kind rock formations.

Of course, the lake also offers up great opportunities for fishing. Wet your line and see who can catch the biggest black bass, crappie, catfish or walleye. Of course, the rainbow and brown trout fishing on the Mountain Fork and Glover Rivers is some of the best in the country. If you are new to the sport of fishing, the area has many professional guides and outfitters to help you catch your limit and to provide everything you need to have an outstanding fishing experience. Temporary fishing permits are reasonably priced for those who are only visiting the area.

The lakes and rivers in the area aren't the only outdoor attraction, though. The surrounding, gracefully curving mountains also await those who want to breathe deep the fresh air. Miles of trails for every level of hiker offer a chance to see breathtaking views and a wide variety of wildlife, including migrating eagles, red-shouldered hawks, raccoons, deer, squirrels, and occasionally, black bears. For ornithologists, bird-watching is splendid in this region. In the Red Slough Wildlife Management Area birders have sighted over 270 different species including many that are rare to Oklahoma.

Hiking isn't the only way to see the pine-covered forests and mountains, though. You can also see them as the Native Americans did - from horseback. Area outfitters have mounts for every kind of rider, from experienced to beginner, so climb up and explore the area from a whole new point of perspective.

For golfing enthusiasts, the 18-hole Cedar Creek Golf Course is considered one of the best in Oklahoma. As a matter of fact, Golf Digest called it the best municipal golf course in Oklahoma. The course, known for its wooded roughs and narrow fairways, winds its way through stands of pine, hickory, and oak. The 16th Hole is their signature hole that features a near island green - virtually surrounded by Broken Bow Lake. The course also has cart and club rentals, a pro shop, and resident pro.

At the end of the day, you can either head to one of Broken Bow's many fine restaurants, or fire up the grill at your cabin and cook some steaks, burgers, or freshly caught fish. Cabin amenities also include fireplaces, covered porches, Jacuzzis, fire pits, satellite television, and DVD players. Some cabins sleep up to as many as 20 people, making it the perfect spot for a weekend family reunion.

Beavers Bend State Park is also handicapped accessible, accepts credit cards, and offers seniors discounts. For your next fun weekend getaway, head to southeastern Oklahoma's McCurtain County, McCurtain County is an easy 2 to 4-hour drive from Dallas, Fort Worth, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, OK, Tyler, TX, Little Rock, AR and Shreveport. LA. To make reservations, visit our website at http://www.mccurtaincountygetaways.com/ or call 800-528-7337.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Marcia_Drewitz/253518
http://EzineArticles.com/?Fun-Weekend-Getaway&id=3431386

How to Store Your #Paddleboard at Home
Posted by Richard Phillips   •   Sunday, 2016-May-15
Camillus Kayak Shop Demo Day 2016
How to Store Your Paddleboard at Home
By Kate E Gallagher

Stand up paddleboards are used for a surface water sport called paddleboarding. Paddleboarders stand on them and move around the ocean, a lake or a river by use of paddles. They look like surfboards but they are bigger. Due to their big sizes, it becomes hard to store them especially for people with limited spaces in their homes. These are some tips which will help you store your stand up paddleboard securely if you have a limited space in your home.

Use Inflatable Paddleboards

Storage of an inflatable paddleboard can be easy and space saving. After paddleboarding, you need to deflate, roll and place it in a compact storage bag. This bag can then be stored in a shelf, closet, cabinet or even in the trunk of your car. The paddleboard should be cleaned and dried up before storage. This may be a tiresome process as you have to inflate it again before going for paddleboarding but it's very easy to store it especially if you have a limited space in your home.

Use of Paddleboard Racks

You can also install paddleboard racks it the walls of your garage or even house where you can suspend your stand up paddleboard. They have hooks which hold the boards in position and are very easy to install. They will help you utilize the limited space in your home efficiently as you will suspend the paddleboard firmly in the walls of your garage which are usually free. Some racks are very beautiful when fixed at the walls of a house hence can be used as decorative elements as they hold the paddleboards. Hanging the paddleboard on walls is a highly recommended storage method as it keeps them dry which makes them durable.

Build Your Own Rack

A couple of people will custom build their own paddleboard storage areas in their home or backyards. A paddleboard lift can be installed in the ceiling rafters of a garage or attic, so the board lays flat, but it is still safely still out of the way. Others will take to their back yard and get a few pieces of weather treated wood and a tarp and construct their own little paddleboard shelving system. These keep the boards out of the house, where there may be very little space, but still ensures they are not just sitting on the ground outside exposed to the elements.

Any of these methods should be able to give you some good ideas as to where to store your paddleboard at home, especially if you are limited on space.

Kate writes all about paddleboarding, at Paddleboarding Central, a site that is dedicated to educating others all stand up paddleboarding. To find out more about paddleboarding, visit Paddleboarding Central.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Kate_E_Gallagher/1578088
http://EzineArticles.com/?How-to-Store-Your-Paddleboard-at-Home&id=8010285

How Many Calories Burned While SUPing? (Stand Up #PaddleBoarding)
Posted by Richard Phillips   •   Sunday, 2016-May-01

By Christian Sinatra

One of the most common questions that people ask me about Stand Up Paddling is "How many calories can I burn"?

I've spent some time online looking for the correct answer but I thought I'd do a little "un-scientific" research myself. So I paddled yesterday using a heart rate monitor and my Polar Computer to give me a pretty accurate picture of a typical SUP workout.

Now a couple of considerations and disclosures. First, the heart rate monitor I used is made for cycling. I simply took the computer off of my bike and put it in my pocket while paddling. Certainly there may be some adjustments that need to be made for the "type of workout" but since large muscle groups are being worked in both cycling and paddling, I don't think the calorie calculation would change very much.

The other consideration is the paddlers size and weight. I'm 6'2" and weigh-in at about 225-228. Additionally, I paddle about 5 days a week which, I hope, means that my condition level should be a bit higher than the average bear. I would expect my average heart rate would be a bit lower as a result.

I conducted my un-scientific test on a clear morning with a slack tide and little to no wind. The conditions were nearly perfect and had little to no effect on my workout (as opposed to a strong head/tail wind, etc.). I paddled a 12' standard board (SupWorks Alpha) which weighs in at 28 pounds and I was using an QuickBlade Kahana carbon fiber paddle.

Here are the results....

  1. Exercise Time: 53:43
  2. In-Zone: 51:32
  3. Average Heart Rate: 147bpm
  4. Calories Burned: 822kcal


Couple of comments:

  1. The "Exercise Time" is the total time from when I started to paddle to when I stopped.
  2. "In-Zone" refers to how many minutes my heart rate was in my "Anaerobic Zone". My "Zone" is between 118bpm and 170bpm.
  3. My average heart rate for the entire workout cycle was 147bpm.
  4. I burned 822 calories for the entire workout. Using the same data, had a continued the same pace for an additional 6:17 making the total workout time 60 minutes, I would have burned a total of 923 calories for the hour. (Sorry for not making it an even 60 minutes, I just paddle a course every day and don't pay much attention to the time)


So the net-net is this. I burn 923 calories per hour on a normal Stand-Up Paddle workout.

It's interesting to me that the my heart rate was as high as it was. On a typical long-distance bike ride (on a Cervelo S1), my heart rate averages in the low mid 130's. When I paddle I don't really feel that I am working as hard as my heart rate (147) would indicate. I also don't feel as "beat" when I am done paddling as when I ride.

So that is my little study. I guess the simple conclusion is that, although my findings are not "scientific" they do show that paddling is a great low-impact core workout. If I burned the 822 calories during a typical workout and did it 5 days a week I would lose over 1 pound a week (assuming my calorie intake stayed consistent).

SupWorks is a manufacturer and online retailer of Stand Up Paddle Boards and Accessories based in Costa Mesa, California. Please visit us at [http://www.supworks.com/].

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Christian_Sinatra/932255
http://EzineArticles.com/?How-Many-Calories-Burned-While-SUPing?-(Stand-Up-Paddle-Boarding)&id=5875773

Choosing the Right 2 Person #FishingKayak for You (And Your Partner)
Posted by Richard Phillips   •   Sunday, 2016-April-24

By Jay Vixton

When it comes to choosing a 2 Person Fishing Kayak, whether it's with your partner, friend or child, you will discover just how stressful it can be. From which one suits both your needs in terms of comfort and space through to trivial matters such as the colour and the styling... It really can be a nightmare, the cause of severe arguments and fall outs. But what I want to do for you, is sum up the main factors of your 2 Person Fishing Kayak, and what you BOTH should be looking for in a kayak.

Space and Comfort
Some kayaks are made for large and long people, some are made for skinny and short... Obviously, if one of your is the latter and the other the former, then you might have a problem, but when you go looking at 2 Person Fishing Kayak then you want to find the one that is perfect for your body shape. So when you're in the shop, try them out! They're not going to say no. Both of you, get in the kayak as if you're going out and well... Are you comfortable?

When BOTH of you are saying "Yes" that's when you know the kayak fits the comfortability criteria that you both have. There's NOTHING worse than a day of kayaking in an uncomfortable kayak.

Practicality
Is there enough storage for all your equipment? Can you fit your rods in? Water proof storage? All these elements should be considered when looking at a kayak. You might find yourself out in the water for a good few hours so you want to have enough storage for all the essentials.

Suitability
You're looking for a fishing kayak, right? So when there's the new super fast, fastest, go faster, super duper fast new kayak: DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT! It's not for you. It might sound cool, but when you're fishing you don't want to be moving fast. You need to look at elements like this so you pick the right kayak for your fishing and not to be the fastest in the water.

Styling and Colour
Shamefully, I had to put this one in (at the end of course). Awful it might not be a crucial factor in your kayaking, it is something you need to consider! If you're a male, would you go out in a bright pink kayak? Unlikely! So even though it's not something you NEED to look at intensively, it is something to consider when going to pick a kayak that you will BOTH be using.

So there you have my summary of elements to consider when purchasing your 2 Person Fishing Kayak... Make sure you pick the right one!

Still not too sure which 2 Person Fishing Kayak [http://cheapkayaksonline.com/2-person-fishing-kayak-whats-the-best-kayak/] is right for you and your partner? Then visit Cheap Kayaks Online, and we will share our TOP THREE 2 Person Fishing Kayaks with you. Click Here! [http://cheapkayaksonline.com/2-person-fishing-kayak-whats-the-best-kayak/]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Jay_Vixton/1423585
http://EzineArticles.com/?Choosing-the-Right-2-Person-Fishing-Kayak-for-You-(And-Your-Partner)&id=7300633

The Fastest Growing Water Sport - #KayakFishing and the Evolution of Kayaks and Fishing Hand Paddles
Posted by Richard Phillips   •   Sunday, 2016-April-17

By Ed Halm

Paddle sports are the fastest growing water sport today. Kayaking, canoeing and rafting are now destination activities. With all the green and eco friendly activities available, paddle sports have dominated the outdoor adventure scene. Paddle sports are low impact on the environment, inexpensive, thrilling and always memorable.

Not to be left out, the fishing and sporting communities wanted in on this explosion. Kayakers, anglers and sportsmen merged concepts and technologies. Along with diversity came opportunity. New specialty equipment, gear and accessories evolved. Fishing kayaks and kayak fishing hand paddles evolved from this call to action.

With the rapid growth of paddle sports, there has been a definitive diversification of the sport into various disciplines. All the technological and manufacturing advancements have fueled the sudden increase in the sport. Kayak fisherman and kayak sportsman have recently dominated the growth in the paddle sports arena.

Kayak fishermen, also known as kayak anglers, and kayak sportsmen require specialty equipment, gear and accessories to effectively pursuit their sport. Their fishing kayaks and fishing hand paddles are specifically designed to accommodate their dynamic environments and distinctive sporting activities.

Kayak anglers and sportsmen have designed boats for easy access and mobility. Many facets of their kayak design reflect accoutrements that were found only on motorized fishing vessels. Today you can find rod holders, live wells, storage compartments, battery wells, fish finders, anchors, etc. If they can fit a specialty fishing accessory on a twelve to fourteen foot kayak, they will try to get it on there! They even have twin hulled, foot propelled and battery operated kayaks for the hard core anglers.

For ease of access and dismount, the anglers use a modified version of the sit on top kayak, or SOT. SOT's were a natural conversion platform for kayak anglers. These boats are self bailing, meaning that any water that gets in the kayak will be drained away by gravity. Getting on and off is much easier that a sit in kayak. Turning or sliding around to access tackle or gear behind you is much simpler evolution.

With this approach to fishing from kayaks, came another conundrum that caused problems in the kayak angling community. How do you paddle and fish at the same time? Think about it. Can you hold your fishing rod and a kayak paddle at the same time?

Paddling your kayak and fishing at the same time became a comedy on the water. It takes two hands to wrangle a seven foot kayak paddle, no matter how you hold it. Throw in a fishing pole, and you soon realize you need three hands!

Kayak fishing hand paddles evolved from pioneering anglers solving this problem with ping pong paddles, Kadema paddles, modified badminton racquets and the sort. They could hold onto their fishing rod and with the other hand paddle their boat stealthily toward their prey.

It soon became apparent that flailing a seven foot paddle is not conducive to shallow water, or skinny water fishing. The fish can see you! The best way to sneak up on your prey is to glide stealthily toward them. While holding your fishing rod, using a little six or seven ounce fishing hand paddle to propel your kayak, about 16" long, is perfect for the task.

As you begin your foray into kayak fishing, do your research. Peruse the internet, talk to local anglers, visit local outfitters and try various kayak platforms and fishing hand paddles. That little effort will certainly make your fishing trip much more rewarding and memorable. Fish on!!

Ed Halm is a retired US Navy survival instructor, kayak eco-tour guide and owner of Backwater Paddle Company, a paddle sports business located in central Florida.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Ed_Halm/559463
http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Fastest-Growing-Water-Sport---Kayak-Fishing-and-the-Evolution-of-Kayaks-and-Fishing-Hand-Paddles&id=3766106

Teaching Your Children to #Paddleboard
Posted by Richard Phillips   •   Sunday, 2016-April-10
by Lisa Jeeves

A popular water sport, mainly among teens and young adults, paddle boarding is also a child friendly activity that is fairly easy for kids to pick up and excel at. As long as your children have basic swimming skills and are comfortable in and around water, teaching them to paddleboard is going to be quite simple and a lot of fun! Here are some tips to get you started.

Start With Safety

First and foremost, ensure your child is wearing a certified life jacket when learning any new child friendly activity involving water. Safety always comes first! You will be starting your son or daughter out in shallow water, but a life jacket is going to make any tumbles off a paddle board that much safer, and really, it’s just good practice for water sports.

Second, ensure you are teaching the skills of paddle boarding in not only shallow water, but in an area that is calm and a safe distance away from waves, currents, boats and swimmers that may be in the area. This is going to allow for the safest conditions to teach and minimise distractions, as well as protect swimmers from a possible projected paddleboard in the event of a fall.

Get Equipped

Once you have obtained a paddleboard, through purchase or rental, equip your kids with child sized paddles. Although paddle boarding is a child friendly activity, child sized paddles can be challenging to come by so an adult paddle that can be adjusted down to child’s size will work also. Show them how to hold the paddle shaft with two hands instead of the proper adult position of one hand on top of the paddle handle.

Tip: don’t forget the sunblock, sunglasses and sun hat to protect your child from the sun while out on the water.

Start With Kneeling

Start with having your ‘students’ kneel on the paddleboard before attempting to stand, to give them a feel for the water beneath the board. This is a good time to teach your children the basic skills of paddle boarding, including the forward paddle stroke and buoy-turn, and have them practice paddling while still in a kneeling position. Give them some practice time while still on their knees until they feel ready to take it to the next level and stand.

Time to Stand!

Help the little ones stand to their feet by stabilising the paddleboard until they are up and balanced. Stand by and spot them as they continue to balance and begin to practice the skills they learned while kneeling. Standing close to your children’s paddleboards will also help you keep them away from other activities that may be happening in the water nearby that could threaten to interfere.

Paddle boarding is a child friendly activity that is pretty easy to teach, but you may want to consider signing your offspring up for a lesson if you lack experience and are unfamiliar with the strokes. Any place that rents paddleboards will most likely offer a beginners’ class to get the kids started. You may also want to consider taking a lesson together, so you can enjoy the day together out on the water on paddleboards!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Richard Edwards is the Managing Director of Summit & Blue, an adventure holiday company offering independently crafted child friendly activity holidays to exciting destinations around the world, including France, Italy, Portugal, the USA and Canada. With unique itineraries and exciting activities like biking, hiking, white water rafting and canoeing, we create holidays for those looking for an experience a little more off the beaten track.

Teaching Your Children to #Paddleboard
Posted by Richard Phillips   •   Sunday, 2016-April-10
by Lisa Jeeves

A popular water sport, mainly among teens and young adults, paddle boarding is also a child friendly activity that is fairly easy for kids to pick up and excel at. As long as your children have basic swimming skills and are comfortable in and around water, teaching them to paddleboard is going to be quite simple and a lot of fun! Here are some tips to get you started.

Start With Safety

First and foremost, ensure your child is wearing a certified life jacket when learning any new child friendly activity involving water. Safety always comes first! You will be starting your son or daughter out in shallow water, but a life jacket is going to make any tumbles off a paddle board that much safer, and really, it’s just good practice for water sports.

Second, ensure you are teaching the skills of paddle boarding in not only shallow water, but in an area that is calm and a safe distance away from waves, currents, boats and swimmers that may be in the area. This is going to allow for the safest conditions to teach and minimise distractions, as well as protect swimmers from a possible projected paddleboard in the event of a fall.

Get Equipped

Once you have obtained a paddleboard, through purchase or rental, equip your kids with child sized paddles. Although paddle boarding is a child friendly activity, child sized paddles can be challenging to come by so an adult paddle that can be adjusted down to child’s size will work also. Show them how to hold the paddle shaft with two hands instead of the proper adult position of one hand on top of the paddle handle.

Tip: don’t forget the sunblock, sunglasses and sun hat to protect your child from the sun while out on the water.

Start With Kneeling

Start with having your ‘students’ kneel on the paddleboard before attempting to stand, to give them a feel for the water beneath the board. This is a good time to teach your children the basic skills of paddle boarding, including the forward paddle stroke and buoy-turn, and have them practice paddling while still in a kneeling position. Give them some practice time while still on their knees until they feel ready to take it to the next level and stand.

Time to Stand!

Help the little ones stand to their feet by stabilising the paddleboard until they are up and balanced. Stand by and spot them as they continue to balance and begin to practice the skills they learned while kneeling. Standing close to your children’s paddleboards will also help you keep them away from other activities that may be happening in the water nearby that could threaten to interfere.

Paddle boarding is a child friendly activity that is pretty easy to teach, but you may want to consider signing your offspring up for a lesson if you lack experience and are unfamiliar with the strokes. Any place that rents paddleboards will most likely offer a beginners’ class to get the kids started. You may also want to consider taking a lesson together, so you can enjoy the day together out on the water on paddleboards!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Richard Edwards is the Managing Director of Summit & Blue, an adventure holiday company offering independently crafted child friendly activity holidays to exciting destinations around the world, including France, Italy, Portugal, the USA and Canada. With unique itineraries and exciting activities like biking, hiking, white water rafting and canoeing, we create holidays for those looking for an experience a little more off the beaten track.

<August>  <2018>
SUMOTUWETRFRSA
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Archive
July,2016 [2]
June,2016 [3]
May,2016 [4]
November,2015 [2]
October,2015 [2]
April,2014 [7]
March,2014 [8]
February,2014 [8]
January,2014 [9]
December,2013 [2]

Search

Bloly v1.3 by SoftCab Inc